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EACEA National Policies Platform: Youthwiki
Netherlands

Netherlands

6. Education and Training

6.3 Preventing early leaving from education and training (ELET)

On this page
  1. National strategy
  2. Formal education: main policy measures on ELET
  3. Addressing ELET through non-formal and informal learning and quality youth work
  4. Cross-sector coordination and monitoring of ELET interventions

National strategy

There is no national strategy concerning early leaving from education and training.

 

Formal education: main policy measures on ELET

 

Policy on school dropout

LOB (career guidance and counselling) applies to all pupils. But there is also a policy that targets specific groups in the youth population. According to a press release (only in Dutch)  published on the website of the Dutch government of April 2016, approximately 66,000 young people under the age of 27 were in vulnerable positions in the labour market. Although school dropout decreased massively in the last couple of years (from more than 70,000 annually towards less than 25,000 in 2015) this figure called  for extra focus on this group. In November 2015 Minister Lodewijk Asscher of Social Affairs and Employment and Minister Jet Bussemaker of Education, Culture and Science announced that they would make policy arrangements with municipalities to help young people find jobs and to tackle school dropout. (See also 3.4 Career Guidance and Counselling – internal link toevoegen)

 

Vocational training and the job market

Since 2014 government has taken various actions. In September 2015 the Minister of Social Affairs and Employment made € 14 million available to tackle youth unemployment. The ministry is working together with companies and municipalities to support young people to find suitable jobs. Municipalities focus on supporting young people without a diploma or  necessary basic qualifications. For these youngsters, a combination ofwork and learning in so-called ‘learning companies’ (leerbedrijven) has been created as an educational route, in the sense of ‘learning-by-doing’.

An important part of the vocational educational training programmes consists of working and learning in practice, known as work placements. The  organization responsible for this programme is the Cooperation Organisation for Vocational Education, Training and the Labour Market (SBB). SBB advises the ministers of Education, Culture and Science and of Economic Affairs on ways to link vocational education and the job market. They differentiate between practice placements and apprenticeships. More about this educational route of learning by doing can be found in chapter 3 Employment and Entrepreneurship.

 

Employment support

NJi provides information about policy and practice of employment support. It also describes the target group: young people between 16 to 27 who are vulnerable because they have one or more problems in various living domains, such as learning, working, social relations or self-reliance. They often have difficulties in getting the obligatory basic qualification needed to find a job. More about employment support is described in Chapter 3 Employment and Entrepreneurship.  

 

Action plan Youth Employment

Ministries are required to monitor and assess their policies on a regular basis. They have to report the results to the Senate and the House of Representatives, as well as use the results to improve policy. The guidelines for the evaluation of policy are laid down in the Accounts Act (Comptabiliteitswet) (2001) (only in Dutch) and in the Measure on Periodical Evaluation research (Regeling Periodiek Evaluatieonderzoek) (2012) (only in Dutch).

The evaluation showed that the Actionplan Youth employment led to valuable cooperation on national and regional levels, and provided an important foundation for future activities to improve youth employment.

Dutch government is actively involved in taking care that young people leave school with a diploma and are able to find suitable jobs. Government takes policy measures and cooperates with both the business world and the education sector to achieve this.

Municipalities focus on supporting young people without a diploma or the necessary basic qualifications. For these youngsters combining work and learning in so-called ‘leerbedrijven’ (learning companies) has been developed as an educational route, in the sense of ‘learning-by-doing’.

A recent study of Eurostat (2016) showed that compared with other European countries the lowest share of young people not in education or employment between  20-24 is in the Netherlands.

 

Youth employment in 2017

According to Statistics Netherlands (CBS) (15 June 2017), unemployment declined with an average of 6 thousand per month over the previous three months and stood at 456,000 (5.1 percent of the labour force) in May. The sharpest decline was seen among young people. According to Minister Lodewijk Asscher of Social Affairs and Employment this decline  is due to good economic prospects. The economy grows faster than expected and there are more jobs and job openings. Read more in Chapter 3 Employment and entrepreneurship in 3.1 General context (internal link met 3.1)

 

Addressing ELET through non-formal and informal learning and quality youth work

 

Tackling youth unemployment

According to the Tackling Youth unemployment policy (Aanpak Jeugdwerkloosheid) public career guidance targeting young people takes place within formal education institutions. Every pupil has a mentor , who can coach him or her when necessary. Also a school career adviser can counsel pupils on how to approach their studies and future career opportunities.  No information was found regarding informal education providers. The business sector is an important actor for offering work placements to students. To achieve this the ministries started a partnership with the business sector. Read more about this in chapter 3.4 Career Guidance and Counselling (internal link toevoegen)

Dutch government (Rijksoverheid) does not only focus on students in secondary schools, but has also developed measures for students in secondary vocational education. The Ministry of Education, Culture and Science is responsible for these policy measures. You can read more about these policy measures in the following paragraphs.

 

Cross-sector coordination and monitoring of ELET interventions

No information on cross-sector coordination and monitoring of ELET interventions could be found. This will be updated as soon as more information is available.